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Rural News

Owner of loose bull in fatal crash charged with manslaughter

Capital Press | Posted on June 15, 2016

A man whose loose bull wandered onto a road and was hit by a car, killing the driver, is facing an involuntary manslaughter charge, the prosecutor said, and farmers are worried about the harm a conviction could do to the state’s agriculture economy.  Farmers and friends packed a legal proceeding at a courthouse Monday in support of bull owner Craig Mosher, whose lawyer has called the car crash “a horrible accident.”

Some farmers fear Mosher’s prosecution could set a precedent that stands to hurt the state’s economy, whose staples include dairy farming, artisanal foods and forestry. They would like to see the charge, which carries a sentence of up to 15 years in prison upon conviction, dropped.


N.Y. bill proposes burials with pets

Trib Live | Posted on June 15, 2016

New York state may soon allow pet owners to spend eternity with their furry companions.  The state Legislature has passed a bill allowing cemeteries, except for religious ones, to offer people the option of being buried with the cremated remains of a dog, cat or other tame domesticated animal.  Cemeteries wouldn't be required to allow pet remains.

Supporters say they expect many pet owners will embrace the idea. They say cemeteries should be free to offer the option.  The proposal is the latest in a series of measures honoring the bond between human and beast. Last year, New York lawmakers passed a law allowing dogs on restaurant patios. They are considering a ban on cat declawing.


Rancher lassos bike thief outside Oregon Wal-Mart

ABC13 | Posted on June 15, 2016

A rancher jumped on his horse and lassoed a man who was trying to steal a bicycle in the parking lot of an Oregon Wal-Mart.  Robert Borba was at the Eagle Point store loading dog food and a camping tent into his truck when he heard a woman screaming that someone was trying to steal her bike. The 28-year-old said he quickly got his horse, Long John, out of its trailer. He grabbed a rope, rode over to the man who was reportedly struggling with the bike gears and attempting to flee on foot. Borba lassoed the man around the legs and when he dropped, Borba dragged him to one end of the parking lot.


Technology is improving – why is rural broadband access still a problem?

The Conversation | Posted on June 13, 2016

Specifically, 85 percent of U.S. wireline connections meet the current 25 mbps download threshold, while only 14 percent of wireless connections do so. Satellite connections typically max out at about 15 mbps. In addition, wireless coverage is sometimes spotty and can vary by provider and geography.


New Ohio laws allow breaking into cars to save kids and pets; first responders to treat pets

Cleveland.com | Posted on June 9, 2016

Bills that allow people to break into vehicles to save children and animals have been signed into law by Gov. John Kasich and a third will likely become law. The first law protects people from civil liability and damages. Protection from civil liability would only apply if the person also calls the police or 9-1-1 and believes leaving the child or animal in the vehicle would lead to injury or death.  The law's supporters said it would reduce the number of heatstroke-related deaths among children by allowing good Samaritans to act without hesitation. On a 78- degree day, the inside of a parked car can reach 100 or more degrees in minutes. The second law allows paramedics, EMTs and firefighters to provide aid to dogs and cats when responding to a human emergency. First responders could open and maintain an airway, give mouth to snout ventilation, administer oxygen, control hemorrhage, stabilize fractures, bandage wounds and administer naloxone hydrochloride, also known as Narcan. Goddard's Law, which increases the penalties for intentionally harming or killing a pet, was passed overwhelmingly in the House and Senate but has yet to be sent to Kasich's desk.


As Young Depart, State Looks For Strategies to Keep Them

Hartford Courant | Posted on June 9, 2016

Though young graduates moving out of the state isn't a new phenomenon, it's an issue that has become increasingly important as some of Connecticut's biggest businesses begin pondering whether to leave. Many companies say attracting and retaining young talent, with the technological skills the baby boomer generation lacks, is vital to their economic future.


An All-In Response to the Opioid Crisis

Pew Charitable Trust | Posted on June 9, 2016

By its own calculations, this city of 50,000 on the Ohio River has the highest drug overdose death rate in a state ranked No 1 in the nation for overdose deaths. The city’s overdose death rate, at 119 per 100,000 last year, is nearly 10 times the national rate. It’s not a statistic that Huntington advertises in tourist brochures or welcome packages for students attending the local college, Marshall University. But Mayor Steve Williams said the worsening heroin problem was becoming so plain to everyone that “we had to define it, before it defined us.”

And so, with some state and federal lawmakers backing him up, the city’s law enforcement and public health leaders, along with education, business and religious groups, joined forces in 2014 to attack the problem. The Police Department started trying to divert drug users to treatment rather than jail. The city launched an innovative program for babies born to women who used opioids during pregnancy, and opened a drug court for women charged with prostitution. There’s also a new school-based program for kids whose parents are arrested for drug crimes. But Kilkenny and others say there is a dire shortage of treatment in Huntington and surrounding Cabell County, particularly medication assisted addiction treatment using one of the three federally approved medicines — methadone, buprenorphine or naltrexone.


An All-In Response to the Opioid Crisis

Pew Charitable Trust | Posted on June 9, 2016

By its own calculations, this city of 50,000 on the Ohio River has the highest drug overdose death rate in a state ranked No 1 in the nation for overdose deaths. The city’s overdose death rate, at 119 per 100,000 last year, is nearly 10 times the national rate. It’s not a statistic that Huntington advertises in tourist brochures or welcome packages for students attending the local college, Marshall University. But Mayor Steve Williams said the worsening heroin problem was becoming so plain to everyone that “we had to define it, before it defined us.”

And so, with some state and federal lawmakers backing him up, the city’s law enforcement and public health leaders, along with education, business and religious groups, joined forces in 2014 to attack the problem. The Police Department started trying to divert drug users to treatment rather than jail. The city launched an innovative program for babies born to women who used opioids during pregnancy, and opened a drug court for women charged with prostitution. There’s also a new school-based program for kids whose parents are arrested for drug crimes. But Kilkenny and others say there is a dire shortage of treatment in Huntington and surrounding Cabell County, particularly medication assisted addiction treatment using one of the three federally approved medicines — methadone, buprenorphine or naltrexone.


Farming plays major role in Obama's community revitalization effort

Agri-Pulse | Posted on June 8, 2016

Farming, food processing and distribution are playing a major role in a community revitalization program designed to lift people out of poverty and reduce crime in special Promise Zones across the country, USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack said.  One of the nine new Promise Zones announced Monday is in southwest Florida. The area has developable land, an unemployment rate of over 30 percent, and plenty of potential for growth, Vilsack told reporters in a teleconference. Creating an ecotourism industry in the area is one possibility that federal and local officials are looking at, but perhaps an even more lucrative option would be to help establish and promote locally grown food, Vilsack said. Because of the area's new designation as a Promise Zone, it will have special access to a wide variety of federal programs, and USDA is prepared to help new farmers open markets for their crops with schools, farmers markets and restaurants.


Baby Fish Prefer Plastic Over Natural Food

Smithsonian Magazine | Posted on June 8, 2016

Larval perch gorge themselves on microplastics, which seems to be stunting growth and affecting natural instincts.  Earlier this year a report from the World Economic Forum claimed there could be more plastic in the ocean than fish by 2050 and president Obam signed a ban on plastic microbeads into law late last year. Now, a new study shows that the problem may be more urgent than first thought—some baby fish choose plastic microparticles over natural food, leading to stunted growth and changes in behavior.

 


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