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Energy News

Coal downturn hits railroads hard

High Country News | Posted on April 30, 2016

Federal transportation board rejected a proposed Montana railroad due to coal bankruptcies.

In the latest ripple effect from the coal industry’s troubles, the federal Surface Transportation Board cancelled a proposed railroad in southeastern Montana on Tuesday. The Tongue River Railroad project was designed to connect the proposed Otter Creek coal mine to an existing BNSF Railway line. Arch Coal, one of several large U.S. coal companies that have filed for bankruptcy, pulled its application for mine permits last month but Arch and its partners still wanted the federal government to keep the proposal for the railroad alive, in hopes that they could revive the mine project in the future. Ranchers, who have fought the rail line for decades, appealed to the Surface Transportation Board to reject the railroad, given the bankruptcies and the weak market for coal.


Fifteen lawsuits seeking eminent domain over pipeline easements

Farm and Dairy | Posted on April 29, 2016

Kinder Morgan Utopia has filed lawsuits seeking eminent domain against 15 Harrison County landowners.

The lawsuits were filed April 4 against landowners who have declined all Kinder Morgan Utopia offers for pipeline easements across their properties.

The Kinder Morgan Utopia pipeline will stretch 240 miles and carry ethane and ethane-propane mixtures from the Utica shale fields in Harrison County, Ohio, to Fulton County, Ohio. From there, it will proceed through Michigan to Ontario.


First U.S. Gas Shipment En Route to Europe

Wall Street Journal | Posted on April 25, 2016

A tanker from Louisiana loaded with U.S. natural gas is en route to Portugal, the first shipment in a trade relationship that could shake up the European market. In Europe, American gas will add to a swell in supply in a crowded market long dominated by Russia. Analysts predict that the arrival of U.S. gas could trigger a price war, leading to lower prices for consumers that could act as a shot in the arm for the struggling European economy.


As Oil Jobs Dry Up, Workers Turn to Solar Sector

Wall Street Journal | Posted on April 25, 2016

Plunging oil and gas has generated more than 84,000 pink slips in Texas, according to the Texas Alliance of Energy Producers. But many rig hands, roustabouts, pipe fitters and even some engineers are finding a surprising alternative in the utility-scale solar farms rising from the desert near the border with New Mexico.

The 30,000 jobs the U.S. solar sector is projected to add this year are a fraction of the estimated 150,000 American jobs being lost in oil. And it remains to be seen whether such workers will stay in the solar sector if an oil boom returns, and beckons again with the lure of bigger paychecks that can stretch into the six figures.


Firm suspends plans to build $3.3B natural gas pipeline

AP | Posted on April 25, 2016

Plans to build a $3.3 billion natural gas pipeline from New York into New England through western Massachusetts and southern New Hampshire have been suspended.


Will states find other revenue streams to weather the fossil fuel bust?

High Country News | Posted on April 22, 2016

Gaping deficits wrought by tumbling fossil fuel prices are forcing states like Alaska and Wyoming to slash spending, but little is being done – at least for now – to address politically unpopular, longer-term questions about new revenue models that would lessen their dependence on boom-and-bust industries. 

This year severance tax revenue in Wyoming is projected to fall to about 70 percent of 2014 levels. In Alaska, a more-than $4 billion deficit has set in, just three years after a $13 billion budget surplus. Policymakers are considering minor tax increases on things like motor fuel and alcohol and a planned tax on newly legalized marijuana that would collect a relatively small amount. But there may be no lasting fix for Alaska and Wyoming unless broad-based, unpopular taxes are introduced to help diversify revenue. For years, Alaska’s oil production has been on a downward trend, and Wyoming coal output has fallen steadily this decade. Those declines raise troubling questions about the road ahead.


Roadmaps for everystate to renewable energy

Stanford | Posted on April 21, 2016

This study presents roadmaps for each of the 50 United States to convert their all-purpose energy systems (for electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, and industry) to ones powered entirely by wind, water, and sunlight (WWS). The plans contemplate 80–85% of existing energy replaced by 2030 and 100% replaced by 2050. C


Report: Clean Power Plan Must Be Fair to Rural Communities, Workers

The Daily Yonder | Posted on April 6, 2016

Rural America has long produced much of the nation’s energy. However, a majority of the nation’s energy is consumed in urban areas, where most of the nation’s people and infrastructure are located. This gap between energy production and consumption means that energy policy has very different implications for rural and urban communities.


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